INTRODUCING SEAS

INTRODUCING SEAS

             Columbia's tradition in engineering and applied science education traces back to the
chartering of King's College in 1754.Steamboat inventor John Stevens graduated from the college a few years before the Revolutionary War , and Dewitt Clinton,the statesman responsible for the Erie Canal,earned his Columbia degree in 1786.Columbia's legacy of engineering
             Nary a moment is wasted in four years.The Columbia student knows how to balance school work with the myriad social and student on-campus activities,as well as the vast number of goings-om in the city at any given moment.
            Students are graduated with  factual knowledge as street smarts.One student may have spent hours working on differential equations,but also balanced that with tutoring an inner-city high school student in algebra.Another might have composed a thesis on presidential-congressional relations while campaigning for a spot on the college's Student Senate.Columbia's legacy of student involvement and activism recorded in the school's rich history, is unmatched by any other high-caber institution of higher learning.
            Columbia seeks out the nation's young leaders-those high school seniors who have made great strides in their school and community.The comprehensive admissions application is a canvas on which prospective students paint a picture of themselves,their goals ,hopes,and interests.Once admitted,Columbia's Office of Financial Aid and Educational Financing will continue to do so for the remaining three years.
            Four years at Columbia College breeze by .Perhaps this is best reflected by the number of grads who stick around to pursue graduate work in any one of the university's remaining fifteen schools,or by the number of grads who pursue jobs in New York City .But for and wide , Columbia college alums share that everlasting some thing special-four years in which they were urged to find themselves and become freethinkers ready to serve as leaders in their communities and beyond.

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